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AP English Literature and Composition

AP Literature Course Study Tips

❶Student Choice Rubric Score What the College Board Says What it Means These essays offer a well-focused and persuasive analysis of the assigned theme and how it relates to the work as a whole. Encourage your students to visit the AP English Literature and Composition student page for exam information and exam practice.

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AP English Literature: Exam Format and Question Types

Nothing looks worse than using a word incorrectly in your essay. On the first two essays, you will be asked to read a passage and analyze it according to the instructions given in the question. Use the passage to your advantage. Frequently refer back to specific parts of the text. This will show the readers that you paid very close attention to detail when reading the passage. The specific references display the ability to close read, which is a skill covered frequently in an AP English Literature course.

The third free response question on the AP Literature exam is more open ended than the first two. You will be asked a question and you will be given the opportunity to answer it pertaining to a work of literature that you have read in class. If a particular work of literature stands out to you, prepare early to choose this as the piece to write about in your third essay.

As they say, practice really does make perfect. A good option for practicing free response questions involves searching the Internet for old exam rubrics. These show you exactly what the scorers are looking for in an essay. The AP Literature section of AP Central , a website created by the College Board to help with studying for exams, has several practice exams for your use.

Take advantage of this and practice writing essays using different prompts from previous exams. Use a Good Writing Utensil: Nothing is worse than getting halfway through an essay and having your pen run out of ink, or your pencil getting smudged.

Often, readers prefer the look and clarity of black ink to colored ink or the graphite of pencil. Take that into mind when going into the free response portion of the exam. Before the free response portion begins, work out how much time you need to spend on each question. It may even be helpful to bring a watch to time yourself on each essay.

You need to give yourself ample time to complete each question. However, you also need to be sure that you are not rushing through the questions and leaving vital information out of your essays. The clarity of your writing is necessary for a good score on your essay. If the reader cannot decipher your chicken scratch, how can they possibly score it?

Although this may be acceptable for the multiple-choice portion of the exam, it is absolutely inexcusable for your essays. You only get three chances to prove your competency in the free response portion. Understand What the Readers are Looking For: As we said earlier, rubrics are a great resource to use when preparing for the AP Literature exam.

They reflect exactly how your essay will be scored. Whether or not you understand what is happening in the passages given to you to read.

Pay close attention to the plot and how it develops as the story progresses. Whether or not you understand the theme of the passage. The theme is the dominating central idea in a work. The more references to the plot that you have in your essay, the better.

However, this does not mean restate the entire storyline. This will bore the reader and make it seem like you are dancing around the question. Scorers like for you to be very clear and to the point in your essays. The voice of your essay is an incredibly important characteristic used in scoring. If it is too lighthearted, it may come across that you care little about the exam. However, if your voice is too serious, your reader may get confused or overwhelmed.

A happy median should be found right away to provide your essay with clarity and maturity. Listen to Your Teacher: This is perhaps the most important of all the free response tips. Over the course of the semester, your teacher will provide you with ample advice for the exam. Hopefully these tips will help you tackle this massive exam with ease. Retelling what happened in the story is not an analysis. Thanks for the tip from Kim F. Think about the fact that the AP Test readers have been looking at essays on the same topics for three days.

What will you do to be original and stand out that will surprise the reader at 4: Brainstorm what everyone else will say before writing. Thanks for the tip from Amber B.

Answer the question as it is actually asked. Thanks for the tip from Heather I. Answer the question in the introduction. Thanks for the tip from Rhonda G. Focused writing on two or three aspects of the text characterization, use of devices, etc accompanied with analysis will generate a higher score than lightly touching on 5 to 7 aspects.

As a reader we are happy that you can identify techniques, but what we are looking for is analysis. Thanks for the tip from Matt U. Always answer the question: Why did they chose that metaphor?

What effect does it create within the text and within the reader? Thanks for the second tip from Matt U. Pay attention to the wording of the questions and answers! Thanks for the tip from Susan R. Students who read widely and regularly are far more prepared to write and communicate clearly with a deeper understanding than students who do not read.

Reading expands knowledge, vocabulary usage and comprehension and enables students to make connections within and between content areas which real world applications. Thanks for the tip from Elizabeth B. Instead, use your time to focus on meaning. What important insights do you have to share? Make sure you provide much more analysis than plot summary.

Begin with a clear thesis and end with one strong concluding statement. Thanks for the tip from Julie H. Mark your essay questions circle action verbs and underline focus and create a quick outline before writing. The time spent will prevent the heartache of not addressing the prompt.

Each essay is worth the same amount of points, but one is set for you to shine — know three books really well so that you can rock the free-response essay. On the test — do it first while your mind is still fresh. Thanks for the tip from Diane S. Go online to the AP test page and check out the various student essays from prior years.

What makes an essay a 9? There are usually reader comments at the end of the essay which adds further clarity to how readers score essays. They score essays on a point scale. AP final grades of are then derived from this composite score. Individual colleges and universities may vary. Observations of the Chief Reader: Read each prompt of each question very carefully.

Think about the implications of the question, begin thinking about how you will organize your response, and focus on what is asked. Often, students are asked to select a play or a novel to answer a particular question.

Make sure they know that the work they have selected should be appropriate to the question asked. See to it that students have a fair range of readings that they feel familiar with, ones with which they can test the implications of the question and make the decision of the appropriateness of the work to the question asked. Without this flexibility they may force an answer that will come across as canned to the AP Reader. Remind students to enter into the text itself, to supply concrete illustrations that substantiate the points they are making.

Have them take command of what they are writing with authority by means of direct quotation of pertinent information from the text, always writing into the question and never away from it.

Help them to keep their point of view consistent, to select appropriate material for supporting evidence, and to write in a focused and succinct manner. In this presentation, the Chief Reader of the exam, David G. Miller of Mississippi College, gives a brief and helpful walkthrough of the highlights of his Chief Reader Report. This is the core document for this course. It clearly lays out the course content and describes the exam and AP Program in general.

Previously available as a secure resource only through your AP Course Audit account. Since this exam is now publicly available, you can use the questions without restriction.

The Released Exam and the Released Exam are two resources you can use with your students throughout the year. Some information in these Released Exams may not reflect the current course and exam.

A literary analysis of a given poem A literary analysis of a given passage of prose fiction this may include drama An analysis that examines a specific concept, issue, or element in a work of literary merit selected by the student.

AP English Literature Multiple-Choice Tips

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AP Lit Help is a resource for AP Literature and Composition teachers and students. AP Lit Help is a resource for AP Literature and Composition teachers and students The AP Literature and Composition Question 3 essay invited students to consider a character from a work of literature who has received a literal or a figurative gift and.

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The AP English Literature and Composition Exam uses multiple-choice questions and free-response prompts to test students' skills in literary analysis of prose and verse texts. free-response section tests students' ability to analyze and interpret literary texts by composing clear and effective essays. the Chief Reader of the AP Exam. Sep 04,  · We offer a wide variety of writing services including essays, research papers, term papers, thesis among many others. We have a lot of experience in the academic writing industry. We were once.

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The Ultimate List of AP English Literature Tips The AP English Literature and Composition exam is designed to test your ability to think critically and analyze literary excerpts. The test is three hours long and consists of a multiple-choice portion (worth 45% of your grade) and an essay portion (worth 55% of your grade). Sep 11,  · Ap lit essay help. I don't understand how one is meant to balance a full-time job, social life, two uni essays, running a blog, keeping fit and relaxing a bit. ekushey february essays in bangla language.